JHS, Esq.

How Humpty Dumpty Changed the World:

34 Years of Roe

By Ken Connor

Monday, January 29, 2007

Every year since 1973, millions of Americans have paused to remember the day when new words entered the American vocabulary. Words fraught with ambiguity, like “the right of personal privacy”. Euphemisms, like “terminate one’s pregnancy.” Obscure phrases, like “the penumbras of the Bill of Rights.” January after January we take time to remember these words, and the carnage they have caused.

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. . . lose his . . . ahem . . . cookies, so to speak.

I was reminded tonight, as I watched the services for President Gerald Ford and caught a few moments of Ben Stein’s appearance on The O’Reilly Factor, about the evening that I spent with him.

Most people know Ben from “Win Ben Stein’s Money” and “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off.” Lesser known is the fact that Ben worked as a speech writer for Presidents Nixon and Ford, and is a conservative political commentator. He is also a life advocate.

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Bob Schindler, who fought valiantly for years to save his brain-damaged daughter, Terri Schiavo, from an inhumane death by dehydration, has suffered a stroke and is hospitalized in Florida. Bob and his wife, Mary, became my friends when we were called upon to speak publicly together about the then-pending legal struggles to save Terri in […]

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In the July 2006 issue of “California Lawyer,” Gerald Uelmen reviews the work of the California Supreme Court over the past decade under the leadership of Chief Justice Ronald George. Among the best, i.e., well-reasoned, decisions rendered by the Court during Chief Justice George’s tenure, Professor Uelman recognized Conservatorship of Wendland (2001) 26 Cal.4th 519.

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The following comes from the AP: Injured Man’s Brain Rewires Itself By MARILYNN MARCHIONE (July 4) – Doctors have their first proof that a man who was barely conscious for nearly 20 years regained speech and movement because his brain spontaneously rewired itself by growing tiny new nerve connections to replace the ones sheared apart […]

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“Watching Florida” posted a comment in response to my prior entry about the death of Dr. Ronald Cranford that I feel deserves comment, so I am moving it into the body of this blog to assure that readers don’t overlook our exchange. “Watching Florida” said: Without a doubt you are a better person than I […]

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Medical expert in Terry Schiavo case dies Associated Press MINNEAPOLIS – Neurologist Dr. Ronald Cranford, one of the nation’s leading medical ethicists and right-to-die advocates, died Wednesday at a hospice in Edina, from complications of kidney cancer. He was 65. Cranford was thrust into the public spotlight by the case of Terry Schiavo, a Florida […]

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In response to my post about Florence Wendland’s passing, a visitor wrote the following: While reading about this case I would say that if that were my husband no one would stand in the way of letting me do what I felt was best. Your words over the tears in regards to this case and […]

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A shot of Florence and I immediately following the memorial service for her son, Robert Wendland, in July 2001. That’s what I called my client, Florence Wendland, who died last Friday at the age of 83.After all, we spent six years fighting together to prevent her cherished son, Robert, from being dehydrated. And she came […]

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eth·ics (thks)n. The rules or standards governing the conduct of a person or the conduct of the members of a profession.bioethicsn : the branch of ethics that studies moral values in the biomedical sciences Arthur L. Caplan, PhD.Emanuel & Robert Hart Professor of BioethicsChair, Department of Medical Ethics andDirector, Center for BioethicsUniversity of Pennsylvania3401 Market […]

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