In “other” Words

The newscast that brought the Wendland case into the public’s consciousness and began a debate that continues today.

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By Liz Townsend Robert Wendland, severely disabled since a 1993 car accident, will not be starved to death, a California judge has ruled. The case pitted Wendland’s wife, who had asked the court to allow his feeding tube to be removed, against his mother and sister, who insisted he was conscious, responsive, and did not […]

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by Cathy Ramey Associate Editor Life Advocate Magazine Stockton, CA–Two years after an automobile accident failed to kill him, Robert Wendland may die by court order. Wendland, in his mid-forties, was left first in a coma, and then “cognitively disabled” because of injury to his brain. He became newsworthy shortly after waking up from the […]

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International Anti-Euthanasia Task Force IAETF Update Volume 11, Number 5 — November-December 1997 On 12/9/97, Judge McNatt ruled that Rose Wendland had failed to present clear and convincing evidence that starving and dehydrating Robert to death would be in his best interest. “If I have to choose life and death based on the evidence presented […]

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by Wesley J. Smith Robert Wendland should die so that his family can “be allowed to live their lives,” Dr. Ronald Cranford, a Minnesota neurologist and bioethicist, testified recently in the Stockton courtroom of Superior Court Judge Bob McNatt. The chosen method of death? Intentional dehydration and starvation. What has Wendland, 45, done to deserve […]

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by Wesley J. Smith Killing is not appropriate to the light. It is easiest done in the shadows, behind closed curtains, under cover of darkness, where nobody can see. To verify the truth of this, we only have to look to California’s Central Valley, to Stockton, where attorneys for the Lodi Memorial Hospital and attorneys […]

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by Wesley J. Smith Robert [Wendland] will need to learn to adjust to no stimulation,” reads the sign above the cognitively and physically disabled man’s bed at Lodi Memorial Hospital West. This means that for much of the time, Robert lies in bed, without lights, music or television. He may only have visitors for 1 […]

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Disclaimer: Many of these news articles and video clips contain erroneous information, especially concerning the underlying facts of Conservatorship of Wendland and Robert’s medical condition. This repository is provided for historical purposes and to allow the reader to gain a basic understanding of the issues. Specific questions may be addressed to admin at robertslegacy dot […]

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I called my client, Florence Wendland, who died in 2006 at the age of 83, “Mom.” My own mother knew that and did not object to my bestowing that term of endearment upon another woman. Perhaps it does not seem appropriate for a lawyer to bestow such an intimate nickname upon a client within the […]

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